In my experience, there is a big difference in the concept of learning in the Western world and in the Japanese one, when it comes to something like a martial art or  DO  道(way.).

The emphasis in the West is for the teacher to teach and explain the techniques and for the student to memorize them and to continue to do so. In Japan, after the basic technique have been mastered, the emphasis turns to the Sensei 先生 (teacher) just doing his art and for the students to learn by "stealing" with their eyes.

The ultimate scope is not to recreate a copy or the Sensei. The scope is for the student to overcome the teacher and become themselves the next Sensei. Of course not everybody will have the talent for it and they will not move on as teachers. But as a teacher, there is nothing more rewarding and yet sad then being overcome by their own student.

But before the student can move on to create their own 道 way, they need to master the basic, to the point that their body knows what to do without their mind having to tell it to do it. Only after the basic are understood, the student is ready to break from tradition and create his own new one.

When it comes to learning the ropes of Kinbaku and Shibary, (yes, pun intended), here are some words from  an interview with Hajime Kinoko by KabukiJoe (and here are some more words from it  )
(note: HK seems to use Kinbaku and shibari pretty much interchangeably)

"Akechi Denki is my biggest influence. 3 month before dieing he came as a Kimbaku Teacher to my club and talked and showed some Shibari. When I saw his Shibari, it was different from anything I had seen before. What was different, is that all the other [kinbakushi] where just like following predetermined patterns on how to tie, like those Plastic Model Sets you put together and you all get the same toy at the end.

Akechi Denki [rope] instead was [like] clay, adjusting and fitting to the model's body at hand, with a freedom and a flow of the rope matching the model. It looked very free.

Also, after seeing Akechi Denki, my own shibari changed and I now try to read where my model "wants" the rope and go from there. I don't start anymore with a plan on what and how to tie, but I go with the moment by moment flow of the sensation from my model and make them into rope, and I think my shibari got more beautiful because of it.

It is not that Akechi Denki thought me that, I felt it by watching him.

From many different teachers, watching different teachers, you learn by stealing the good of each and making it your own.


The techniques I learned from different teachers, but the soul of shibari, I took it from Akechi Denki. "

Authors: rida

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