^ ye olde faithfuls i’ve been using these “quick dry” oil paints for ten years, since abandoning airbrushing - for an impatient sod like me they’re nice as they generally do only take a day to dry (does what is says on the label!) - i suppose they’re kinda like acrylics but less horribly plasticky - [...]

^ ye olde faithfuls

i’ve been using these “quick dry” oil paints for ten years, since abandoning airbrushing - for an impatient sod like me they’re nice as they generally do only take a day to dry (does what is says on the label!) - i suppose they’re kinda like acrylics but less horribly plasticky - and almost like gouache or water colour which does impose limitations and dictates techniques - they use an alkyd medium which of course is frowned upon by oil snobs - not that the opinions of pigment grinding arty traditionalists worry me - nevertheless i decided it’s time to move on again and start using “real” oil paint - new methods to master to make painting interesting again? - or perhaps an experiment i’ll subsequently be forced to concede was a mistake? - i researched the net to pick the “best” brand to buy - but i should have guessed my art department store (sekaido in shinjuku, bless them) mostly only has japanese brands, so i settled on the ever popular windsor and newton (in preference to any named after famous artists) - i read, ideally, one should buy a tube of the same colour by each of the different manufacturers to test and see which is best for you - but i think that’s nonsense - even if some brand’s raw sienna is heavenly creamy edibleness, their burnt umber could have all the consistency and delightfulness of dog poo - so boring old w&n for me it is - they also have liquin (an alkyd medium) which cuts down drying time, yay! (tho certain to cause complaints from k re it’s smell) - …….ha, i work so damn slow, why do i even need fast-drying paint?

^ my new soldiers

Posted: 2010-11-11 12:01:51

Ver fuente original del artículo