“metropolis”, a japanese free magazine for gaijin tourists is doing a feature on me - hopefully appearing in the next issue if it isn’t vetoed - the writer seems quite cool and apparently the editor also not impartial to my work, so maybe no problems - i’ve never seen the mag myself but it apparently [...]

“metropolis”, a japanese free magazine for gaijin tourists is doing a feature on me - hopefully appearing in the next issue if it isn’t vetoed - the writer seems quite cool and apparently the editor also not impartial to my work, so maybe no problems - i’ve never seen the mag myself but it apparently has a big circulation, left in hotels etc - the next issue a halloween special and they figure people will be more open to the sort of thing i do around that time - i’ve been doing their interview over the past week, which is a pain but does allow me to gleefully bitch about things - i guess 90% of it will be edited out for the finished article so, as things are a bit dead on the baby art blog, i thought i’d run the questions here (depending on how much interest) - first one …in slightly amended / expanded / remixed form:

One of the main aims of this article is to help people understand your art. So I want to deal with how your art is misunderstood. Do you understand why your art is so easily misunderstood or are you baffled that many people can’t seem to take it the same way that you paint it?

It’s art, there isn’t really a correct way to interpret it. At least, that is, i don’t have any ulterior manifesto with what i do and then feel dismayed if people don’t “get it”. I think there’s some very blatant humour in much (if not all) my work and I’m surprised when people totally manage to overlook that. “If people don’t laugh at this there must be something wrong with them”? Ha, needless to say, there’s something wrong with them! But that’s okay, any response is fine. Although it isn’t a number one priority for me, you do want to make people think or affect them. Prod the inert lumpen masses. To that end I do almost consciously make my work ambiguous and open to (mis)interpretation, deliberately sending out conflicting messages. Being provocative without blunt facile shock value (though of course many people condemn it as purely that). I often find the bizarre hostility my work sometimes creates reflects back on the antagonist’s own hang ups and insecurities. Because of one certain painting a Jewish girl started berating me as being a nazi - also a supporter of unit 731 atrocities because i live in Japan! And that was another “humourous” painting where i was thinking “how can anyone take this seriously?”


Posted: 2009-09-27 03:04:35Author:trevor brown